Book Review: The Forgotten Home Child by Genevieve Graham

In The Forgotten Home Child, Genevieve Graham has written about an important and true part of Canada’s history. Before reading this book, I had not heard of the British Home Children. Over a hundred thousand extremely poor, British children were sent to Canada between 1869 and 1948 and even though they were classified as orphans, a very small amount actually were. Upon arrival, they became house servants and farm workers and with little to no checks and balances, many were horribly abused and mistreated. I can’t imagine the sadness they must have experienced when their hopes for better lives didn’t come to fruition. In telling this fictional story of true events, the author is bringing a dark part of Canadian history to light and that is exactly why I read historical fiction.

Reasons I liked this book:

Canadian history by a Canadian author.

Meticulous research.

It’s a story of survival.

The author didn’t shy away from the raw and tragic lives the children suffered once in Canada.

Book Quote: “I am ashamed to tell my story, but now I have no choice. My family deserves a history. As much as I don’t want to talk about my past, I do not want them to wonder, as I always have, about their roots. I am haunted by the truth that I have kept from everyone I know, everyone I love.”

Rating: 5 stars

Similar books you’ll enjoy: Orphan Trail by Christina Baker Kline, No Ocean Too Wide by Carrie Turansky.

#indigoemployee

I received a copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

2 thoughts on “Book Review: The Forgotten Home Child by Genevieve Graham

  1. thanks Martina I will read this. my great grandfather came over from Scotland with his sister as home children. I have the page from the log book with his story. It was an interesting time in history.

    Like

  2. Thanks Martina, I look forward to reading this. my great grandfather and his sister came from Scotland as home children. I have info received from the organization about his story. It was an interesting time in history.

    Like

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